Teacup Schnauzer

Teacup Schnauzer

Stocky, robust little dogs standing 12 to 14 inches, Teacup Schnauzers were bred down from their larger cousins, Standard Schnauzers. The bushy beard and eyebrows give Minis a charming, human-like expression. The hard, wiry coat comes in three color patterns: salt and pepper, black and silver, and solid black. Created to be all-around farm dogs and ratters, they are tough, muscular, and fearless without being aggressive.

He a dog breed who’s got it all in one small package: intelligence, affection, an extroverted temperament, humor, and a personality that’s twice as big as he is. Throw in that walrus moustache and quivering enthusiasm, and he’ll make you laugh every day. With a Teacup Schnauzer in the house, you’ll never be alone, not even when you go to the bathroom. He’s got personality-plus, and whether he’s bounding around ahead of you or curled up snoozing on your lap, you’ll never be bored with him around.

The Teacup Schnauzer is a bright, friendly, trainable companion, small enough to adapt to apartment life but tireless enough to patrol acres of farmland. They get along well with other animals and kids. Minis are sturdy little guys and enjoy vigorous play. Home and family oriented, they make great watchdogs.

Christmas, Miniature Schnauzer, Dog

Teacup Schnauzer Nutrition

The Teacup Schnauzer should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are prone to getting overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

The Teacup Schnauzer is a small dog with a whole lot of heart. He’s always in the top 20 most popular breeds in the U.S., England, and Germany, but he’s bred around the world. He is a “people person” all the way: extroverted with moderately high energy, he just wants to have fun. And being with you is fun, no matter what you do. He’s incredibly loyal to his family — and he requires a great deal of attention.

He’s got a long beard and bushy eyebrows, and he’s a handful. Developed as a ratter, he may look just like a smaller version of the Standard and Giant Schnauzers, but he’s a distinct breed of his own. He isn’t used much as a ratter any longer (although the instinct is still there), but he still has the lively, mischievous personality.

He likes to be in the center of the action. He’s fairly good with children and he’s energetic, with a lot of terrier spunkiness. The problem is, he has no clue how small he is, and he’s likely to talk trash to a much larger dog without any concept of the consequences. That swagger of his can get him in trouble, so it’s up to you to keep him in line.

Even though he’s small, don’t mistake your Teacup Schnauzer for a toy breed. This boy is not delicate.

Because of his size, he can be a good city dog, but he needs daily exercise. After all, he’s a terrier! He needs to move. A Teacup Schnauzer also enjoys larger quarters and is great with suburban or farm families (and there might be some rats out there he can take care of for you). He adapts well to any climate, but he can gain weight quickly if he’s not exercised or fed properly.

Beach, Body Of Water, Sea, Sand

Recommended daily amount: 1/2 to 1 cup of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals.

Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl.

And don’t look into his soulful eyes at dinnertime if you’re a softie for a begging dog. Here’s a guy who loves his food, and he can become obese if he’s not fed properly and exercised enough.

For more on feeding your Teacup Schnauzer, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog.

Dog, Arent Canny, Miniature Schnauzer

Teacup Schnauzer Grooming

The Teacup Schnauzer has a double coat—a wiry topcoat, with a soft undercoat—that requires frequent brushing, combing, and grooming to look its best. The breed sheds very little. For the show ring, some of the dog’s coat is regularly “stripped” by hand. Most owners of pet Teacup Schnauzers choose to have the coat trimmed with clippers by a professional groomer. This should be done every five to eight weeks for the dog to look his best. The Teacup Schnauzer should get a bath once a month or so, depending on his surroundings. Nails should be trimmed monthly and ears checked weekly for debris or excess wax, and cleaned as needed.

Teacup Schnauzers are solid black, salt and pepper, black and silver, or white. A solid white Teacup Schnauzer can’t be shown in American Kennel Club shows, however, so white ones are by definition pet quality instead (which makes no difference to the dog’s temperament). Many Teacup Schnauzer fanciers dislike the white coat, feeling that if you want a white terrier you should get a West Highland White Terrier.

He has a double coat. The top coat is wiry. Since the undercoat catches the loose hair, he hardly sheds at all. Because of this, many people think he’s a perfect house dog, especially those who suffer from asthma.

Teacup Schnauzers should be groomed every five to eight weeks to keep them looking their best. Most people take their Teacup Schnauzers to professional groomers to do this, because there are some tricks to getting that beautiful Schnauzer look. You can learn to do it yourself — just expect something less than perfection the first few times, and have a sweater at the ready in case you need to cover up the flaws.

Liver, Color, Miniature, Schnauzer

The coats of Teacup Schnauzers shown in conformation are hand-stripped, a process of removing dead hair. It’s time-consuming and not something to be tackled by novices; it’s for show dogs. Most professional groomers don’t strip but use the clippers. Using electric clippers means that the wiry top coat will disappear, which is why it’s not used on dogs shown in conformation.

Brush your Schnauzer two or three times a week so he doesn’t get matted, especially in the longer hair on his face and legs. Be sure to check his armpits, since this is a place where mats often form. It’s also a good idea to wash his beard after he eats.

Brush his teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.

Trim his nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn’t wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they’re too long. Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding — and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out. So, if you’re not experienced trimming dog nails, ask a vet or groomer for pointers.

His ears should be checked weekly for redness or a bad odor, which can indicate an infection. When you check your dog’s ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections. Don’t insert anything into the ear canal; just clean the outer ear.

Begin accustoming your Teacup Schnauzer to being brushed and examined when he’s a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.

As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.

Dog, Schnauzer, Autumn, Foliage

Teacup Schnauzer Exercise

Alert and lively, Teacup Schnauzers require regular daily exercise to maintain their mental and physical health. They have a medium energy level and can easily adapt to city or country living. The breed benefits from having a fenced area where they can run and chase a ball safely and enjoy playtime with their owner. Their greatest joy is to be with their family and doing activities together. Teacup Schnauzers have a strong prey drive, so they should never be allowed off leash when not in a fenced area, as they might not resist the urge to chase after small animals.

The Teacup Schnauzer is active when inside the house, playing with toys and following you from room to room. He loves to have a yard to play in, but he’ll do well without one if you give him a long walk every day. He needs 45 minutes of daily exercise — remember, a tired Teacup Schnauzer is a good Teacup Schnauzer.

Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Schnauzer doesn’t have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn’t. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Teacup Schnauzer accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.

Never stick your dog in a crate all day long, however. It’s not a jail, and he shouldn’t spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he’s sleeping at night.

Miniature Schnauzer, Black, Dog

Teacup Schnauzer Training

Teacup Schnauzers are friendly, lively, and eager to please, and they learn quickly. The breed’s high intelligence makes it necessary to keep training fun and interesting, as they can get bored with repetition. They should be socialized from an early age, and both dog and owner benefit from puppy training classes as well. The Teacup Schnauzer makes an excellent companion and can do very well in a number of canine sports, including agility, obedience, rally, and earthdog events.

A Teacup Schnauzer is full of life. An extrovert, he loves to be in the thick of the family action. He may even run up to you while you’re sitting down and throw his paws around your neck. He wants to touch you and be next to you all the time, and you can bet he’ll want to sleep plastered to your side.

A bit of a spitfire, the Teacup Schnauzer is a terrier — that means he’s full of himself. He’s a feisty type A and his work involves amusing himself. He is not aloof or independent but needs to be with people, and what’s more, he wants to be in close physical contact. (Your lap is no longer your own.)

He’s very intelligent, which makes training easy, but it also means he’s a master of manipulation. That combined with his stubbornness will keep you on your toes. He’s not as feisty as some terriers, however, nor as dog-aggressive.

Schnauzer, Dog, Miniature Schnauzer

As with every dog, the Teacup Schnauzer needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Teacup Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

The Teacup Schnauzer is active when inside the house, playing with toys and following you from room to room. He loves to have a yard to play in, but he’ll do well without one if you give him a long walk every day. He needs 45 minutes of daily exercise — remember, a tired Teacup Schnauzer is a good Teacup Schnauzer.

Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Schnauzer doesn’t have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn’t. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Teacup Schnauzer accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.

Never stick your dog in a crate all day long, however. It’s not a jail, and he shouldn’t spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he’s sleeping at night.

Dog, Arent Canny, Miniature Schnauzer

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