Teacup Yorkie Breed History, Appearance, Personality, Health and Training

Teacup Yorkie

A teacup Yorkie is a Yorkshire Terrier bred to be significantly smaller than the standard for the breed. The American Kennel Club (AKC) Yorkshire Terrier breed standard states that a Yorkie should weigh no more than seven pounds. Many pet Yorkies weigh a bit more than the standard but are still, relatively speaking, tiny dogs.

Breed History

The Japanese have been breeding miniature sized dogs for several hundred years. The teacup Yorkie originated in Japan in the 1920s. The mini Yorkie was named by the owners of a store in Japan, according to the American Kennel Club. American to Japanese breeding Today, the teacup Yorkie is very popular in the United States and Japan. According to a past article in the Washington Times, American Kennel Club rankings suggest there are around 25,000 Yorkies registered in the U.S. At one time, Japanese breeders sold more Yorkie puppies than the U.S. has Yorkie Kennels. The American Kennel Club has a website devoted to this small dog. Also see www.samanthajsd.com and www.barknyc.com. Why the Teacup Yorkie? The teacup Yorkie is smaller than the standard for the Yorkshire Terrier.

Appearance

The Yorkie typically has a tabby coat with a white chest, a black or tan nose, and white feet. These may be arranged in one or two colors, or all three. The color of the feet can change from red or cream to black when the dog is happy and healthy. Teacup Yorkies are often referred to as small Yorkies because of the resemblance of their miniature body to a teacup. Yorkie Tails The Yorkie’s small size makes it very easy for Yorkies to develop dwarfism and extra toes, which most commonly occur in the ankle and pads of the foot. These extra toes are usually quite hard to see because they are hard to see in the dark. Health A Yorkie has a good chance of being healthy at any age, provided they receive regular grooming and do not have problems that can lead to disfigurement.

Personality

Yorkies are friendly, loving, and often quiet. They are frequently hyperactive and extremely energetic. When not playing, Yorkies are content to lie quietly at your feet or cuddle in your lap. Yorkies love attention and need a lot of it. They love being petted, especially their soft ears, and many times they will jump up and attempt to kiss you. They don’t generally love being walked because they don’t have a lot of patience. It is recommended that owners spend plenty of time walking their Yorkie to help them build up a good endurance. An often-cited characteristic of Yorkies is that they are prone to rolling over on their back when they are playing or sleeping. This may be because of their breed standard or the fact that it is simply their favorite way to play.

Health

Like most small dogs, a Yorkshire Terrier has the potential to have a fairly high risk of serious health issues that require treatment. Some of the health issues that a Yorkie might face are similar to those that larger breeds encounter, such as parasites, allergies and exercise intolerance. Yorkies are prone to ear infections and, unless they are kept in a kennel, are prone to frequent and/or severe dog bites. Because they are, as mentioned earlier, considered small dogs, Yorkies are susceptible to urinary tract infections. Yorkies also have issues with their joints, including degenerative joint disease. With this condition, bones in the dog’s legs may become brittle and have a tendency to break. A broken hip or dislocated shoulder is a common problem.

Training

Yorkie obedience training, puppy socialization, play training, agility training, and tricks are essential to a well-rounded dog, even if a tiny dog. A Yorkie requires training to maintain its behavior. Dog owners and trainers need to be familiar with Yorkie breeds to know what kinds of training to expect. Because they are so quick and friendly, Yorkie puppies love to get in trouble and owners must use firm techniques to teach the puppy a correct behavior. Yorkies are even good candidates to take the canine agility training because they are fast and good at using their speed to their advantage. Exercise and Health Being so small, Yorkies need to get exercise and get plenty of sleep to stay healthy.

Conclusion

While there are many other breeds and mixes that are smaller than Yorkies, the tiny Yorkies we’ve looked at are perfect for people who want small, friendly and/or cuddly little dogs.